Oil firms under siege

Image result for ‫الكامور تونس‬‎Although the international community finally realized the urgent necessity of improving renewable energy and develop around it all of the main technology that we use every day, we cannot disagree about how mesmerizing and fast was the infrastructural development of states like UAE or Saudi Arabia upon discovering oil.
Apparently, that is not the case for the southern region of Tunisia, where English and French oil companies have worked silently and undisturbed for the last few decades.
A lot of Tunisians were completely unaware of the oil production in the country, until a little after the Tunisian revolution in 2011.
This is why today, more than a thousand citizens of Tataouine (yes, that Tataouine from Star wars), after a period of failed negotiation with the government, decided to peacefully block the roads and literally put under siege the oil firms in the zone of Kamour (Tatouine).
It might seem like an extreme way to manifest discontent, but the situation has reached a point of saturation that makes it impossible to ask people to wait.
After 23 years of dictatorship, wiped with a revolution that is still causing troubles in all of the Arab region, Tunisians have the right to know how their resources are being managed and to be part of the next era, the era of a democratic and efficient Tunisia against any kind of corruption.
In parallel, with the fall of the Tunisian dinar, in a web movement called “al rakh la” (that could be translated to “No retreat”) a vast majority of Tataouine citizens and a lot of people from other regions intend to manifest and to block the oil firm’s activities until a real plan and solution is offered to the region.
Is this the best way to manifest? Nonetheless, it is getting the spotlight it deserves.
A lot of people are afraid of an eventual terrorist attack, but it seems that Tataouine once again is standing fearlessly against corruption, which is the uglier face of terrorism in Tunisia and all of the region.

 

And as always a salute from Tunisia
Sabri Tlili Khalfallah